Posts Tagged ‘Spontaneous Healing of Belief’

Resonance in Action

We’ve all experienced a belief that just seems to “happen” and comes out of nowhere. Maybe you’ve felt the inner conviction that you’re in the wrong place at the wrong time.

While there may be no obvious reasons for it, we just know that feeling is definitely there. And it’s usually in our best interest to honor our beliefs in the moment we have them.

Later, in a safe environment, we can look back and explore what may have caused our “inner alarm” to sound. When we do, it’s not uncommon to find that our beliefs have been sparked by something beyond the emotions of love or fear that create our typical feelings. That something is the power of what many people simply call the vibes of body truth, body resonance, or just plain resonance. Continue Reading

Living In A Virtual Simulation

In the 1940s Konrad Zuse (pronounced zoo-s˘uh), the man credited with developing the first computers, had a flash of insight into the way the universe may work. When he did so, he also gave us a new way of thinking about our role in creation. While he was developing the programs to run his early computers, he asked a question that sounds more like something out of the plot of a novel than an idea meant to be taken as a serious scientific possibility.

Zuse’s question was simply this: Is it possible that the entire universe operates as a big computer, with a code that makes whatever is possible, possible? Or, perhaps even more bizarre, he wondered if a form of cosmic computing machinery is continually creating the universe and everything in it. In other words, are we living a virtual reality running on a really big computer made of quantum energy itself? Continue Reading

The False Assumptions Of Science

Although the revolution in the way we think of ourselves began nearly 100 years ago, it may not have been recognized by average people going about their daily routine. The change that it brings to our fast-paced lives of day planners, Internet relationships, and reality TV is happening on such a subtle level that few people may have even noticed that it’s begun.

You probably haven’t read about it in the morning newspaper, for example. It’s unlikely that the question of “reality” has been the topic of conversation in your weekly staff meetings or at the office water cooler . . . that is, unless you’re a scientist working to understand the nature of that reality.

For these people, the revolution is akin to a huge earthquake that registers “off the scale”—while leveling some of the most sacred beliefs of science. Its effects are thundering through their laboratories, classrooms, and textbooks like a never-ending sonic boom.

In its wake, it’s leaving a wide swath of outdated teachings, along with the painful reevaluation of long-held beliefs and even entire careers.

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What Can Software Teach You About Rewriting Your Beliefs?

After leaving the corporate world in 1990, I was living temporar­ily in the San Francisco area developing seminars and writing books by day.

In the evenings, I would work with clients who had asked for my help in understanding the role of belief in their lives and relation­ships.

One evening I scheduled an appointment with a client whom I’d worked with many times before.

Our session began as usual. As the woman relaxed into the wicker chair in front of me, I asked her to describe what had happened in the week since we’d last talked.

She began telling me about her relation­ship with her husband of 18 years. For much of the marriage they’d fought, sometimes violently. She had been on the receiving end of daily criticism and invalidation of everything from her Continue Reading

The Power Of The Placebo Effect

In 1955, H. K. Beecher, the chief of anesthesiology at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, published a landmark paper entitled “The Powerful Placebo.”1 In it, Beecher described his review of more than two dozen medical case histories and his findings, documenting that up to one-third of the patients healed from essentially nothing. The term used to describe this phenomenon was the placebo response—or, as it is more commonly known, the placebo effect.

Placebo is used to describe any form of treatment where patients are led to believe that they’re experiencing a beneficial procedure or receiving a curative agent, while in reality they’re given something that has no known healing properties.

The placebo can be as simple as a sugar pill or common saline solution or as complex as an actual surgery during which nothing is done. In other words, while the patients have agreed to participate in a medical study, they may not know precisely what their role in it will be. To test the placebo effect, they may undergo all of the experiences of surgery—including anesthesia, incisions, and sutures—while in reality nothing is added, taken away, or changed. Continue Reading